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Sitka Spruce Tonewood

Play Those Subtle Acoustic Songs on Sitka Spruce Tonewood Guitars by Alaska Specialty Woods

You see everything when looking for an acoustic guitar: Sitka spruce top, mahogany back and sides, rosewood connect, etc. All extremely noteworthy, yet what does it mean? The more significant part of us aren’t wood specialists, so what precisely do distinctive woods need to do with the sound of an acoustic guitar?

An incredible much. The woods used to manufacture guitars—acoustic guitars specifically—are called tonewoods, and they broadly affect the sound and cost of an instrument. Different woods have particular sound characteristics, mainly when utilized for the highest point of an acoustic guitar, which is the crucial wooden tonal component of the instrument.

Sitka Spruce tonewood is a standout among other tonewood for exemplary guitar on account of its great acoustic legitimacies; aside from the alluring appearance, we can discover in the Sitka Spruce pieces.

Once completed, a guitar made of Sitka Spruce has a unique sparkle that different tonewoods don’t have. Besides, its surface is effortlessly coloring or shading tinting, what turns into leeway if somebody needs to control the wood progressively amid its guitar development process.

Get the highest quality Sitka Spruce tonewood for all acoustic instrument, including guitars, at Alaska Specialty Woods. The fact that we work closely with the forest and the fiber, quality of our tonewood products and their acoustic tonal properties makes our tonewood, soundboard products top-notch and a standout among others.

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Troy Thomas

1 Comment

  1. pnorton30 on September 10, 2019 at 3:01 am

    Hi, just received the top wood I ordered- surprised and pleased that it was up graded since what I had ordered was out of stock- looks great- nice shades red and pink throughout and a nice ring with a knuckle test. Just getting back into working on instruments after a 40ish year break and have been amazed with what is available to buy these days. This will actually go into a banjo I put together in the 70s from a old Orpheum wood rim and a Stew Mac neck. Long buried in a closet and a home to mice at some point the top was shot and some hardware lost-I have stripped it of most of the hardware – filled the holes with walnut plugs and will be replacing the top with wood – so far it is going well. I was wondering if you sell pieces up to 30-36 inches-I will be working on building hammered dulcimers again, hopefully soon- thanks again Paul Norton

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